Art history in Florence: The Church of San Pier Maggiore

Art history in Florence: The Church of San Pier Maggiore

Actually, there is no church anymore. What we see going through the homonymus square is just an arch, the only thing that remains of the old building.

Once there was a womans’ Benedictine monastry, in which the abbess had the institutional duty to welcome the new bishop, when he was in visit to Florence. That’s why the Florentines, with their famous profanity, used to call her the bishop’s bride. The ancient romanic church, which had many changes and modifications during the years, can be seen in the Ghirlandaio’s San Zanobi’s miracle, set today at the Accademia museum.

The church was destroyed in 1783 because of its precary conditions; it all begun with the fell of a column, but the truth is that the duke Leopold II didn’t want to have too many religious istitution in the city of Florence. After the church, that area became a poor zone and lost its magnificence. What we can see now, it’s just three arches of the church’s ancient façade. Two of them are now part of private houses.

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