Italian cooking: la Ribollita

A winter typical dish from Tuscany, here’s the recipe for the last cold days of the season:

INGREDIENTS:

  •  1 black cabbage
  •  1/2 savoy cabbage
  •  2 potatoes
  •  2 carrots
  •  1 onion
  •  10 cherry tomatoes
  •  2 courgettes
  •  1 coast of celery with the leaves
  •   400 grams of cannellini beans
  •  1 can of tomato sauce
  •  Extra virgin olive oil
  • Stale Tuscan bread

PREPARATION

Leave the beans to soak for one night, then boil them in a clay pot.

Fry the onion cut into rounds in a very large pan with extra virgin olive oil; add the diced carrots and the celery chunks, then leave to cook undisturbed until golden brown.

After 5 minutes add the tomatoes slices, season it with salt and pepper and cook over high heat in the pan covered with lid for about 10 minutes.

Then turn down the heat and add the diced potatoes to the pan; after another 10 minutes add the chopped cabbage (savoy and black) too.

To soften everything you can use the cooking water of the beans.

Now add half of the beans to the pan and, after a while, add the chopped zucchini too.

Make a puree with the other half of the beans and mix it with the tomato sauce, then let this mixture dry a little and finally add it to the vegetables you have cooked in the pan.

In the meantime, cut the stale bread into chunks and let it roast in the oven at 180 ° for 3/4 minutes.

Take a clay pan and arrange the diced crusty bread on its bottom.

Pour over the vegetables with the broth and then put another layer of croutons, add more vegetables and broth and season it with a little extra virgin olive oil.

Serve the Tuscan Ribollita very, very warm!

If you wish to know more on Italian cooking or you’s like to take a few lessons to learn and improve your cooking skills with a professional chef, then take a look to our Italian cooking courses!

Italian Cooking: Colomba – Easter Dove Cake

The Easter Dove (in italian la Colomba di Pasqua) is a cake from Italy and traditionally served at Easter. Here’s the recipe!

INGREDIENTS:
1 lb all-purpose flour
5 oz butter
4 ½ oz sugar
1 ¾ oz fresh yeast
3 eggs
5 oz mixed candied fruit
almonds, sweet to taste
coarse sugar to taste
⅛ oz salt

PREPARATION:
Dissolve the yeast in a little warm water and slowly work in half of the flour; allow the dough to rise in a warm place in a floured bowl.

When the dough has doubled in size, place it in a larger bowl and add the remaining flour, beaten eggs, melted butter, sugar and salt.

Work the dough gently until it stops sticking to the sides of the bowl, cover with a cloth and allow to rise for another hour.

Sprinkle flour on the raisins and the candied peel then shake excess flour away in a sieve.

Add the raisins and candied peel to the dough, place in a dove-shaped mould and decorate with almonds, baste with beaten egg and sprinkle with sugar crystals.

Cook in a moderate oven for 20-25 minutes.

If you want to learn this and many other recipes of our cuisine, remember that the Galilei Institute offers Italian cooking courses in Florence, all year round!!

Italian Cooking: Bucatini all’Amatriciana

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guanciale di maiale

The Amatriciana or matriciana is a typical dish of the Italian tradition, known and appreciated in every region. The name comes from Amatrice, a town in the province of Rieti. The main ingredients are guanciale (jowl bacon), pecorino cheese and tomato.

In the nineteenth century and until the beginning of the twentieth century the popularity of the dish in Rome grew considerably. This happened because of the close contacts between Rome and Amatrice. Many innkeepers and restaurant owners in the city were from Amatrice, so that the term “Matriciana” came to mean “inn with kitchen”.

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bucatini

The pasta Amatriciana was very well received and quickly became a classic dish of Roman cuisine.

Here’s the recipe!

Although you can use any type of pasta, the tradition requires to use bucatini (large spaghetti  hollowed in the center).

You need:

  • 400 g of bucatini (or spaghetti)
  •  300 g of peeled tomatoes (in season 4-5 ripe red tomatoes)
  •  150 g of jowl bacon thick sliced
  • 60-70 g of grated pecorino (mild and not too salty)
  •  1 red pepper
  •  1/2 cup of dry white wine
  • extra virgin olive oil
  •  salt and pepper

Bring to the boil the water for the pasta. Meanwhile, cut the bacon into cubes eliminating the hard parts (rind), put on the fire a frying pan and when it is hot, combine the bacon and let it cook on low heat with a little oil.

Add the tomatoes, peeled and chopped and cook over high heat for about ten minutes; season with salt, pepper and remove from heat. As soon as the water bubbles, add the salt and the pasta to cook it. Drain the bucatini “al dente”, season with the sauce, sprinkle with cheese and mix everything.

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bucatini all’amatriciana

To better appreciate the dish, put the pasta Amatriciana in the dishes and add more grated cheese before serving.

Enjoy this delicious recipe with family and friends, accompanied by a good glass of Italian wine! Buon appetito!!

If you want to learn this and many other recipes of our cuisine, remember that the Galilei Institute offers Italian cooking courses in Florence, all year round!!